Lady Cas has a Tiger

"The ladies & dandies have taken to ride in the Mall in St James’s Park in such numbers as to be quite a nuisance."



The Duke of Wellington - George Dawe

The Bonapartes of Baltimore

afactadaykeepsthedoctoraway:

Christmas Eve 1803, the Archbishop of Baltimore presided over a high profile and somewhat shocking wedding.  The bride was the fashionable and beautiful Elizabeth Patterson.  The groom was Jerome Bonaparte, brother of Napoleon Bonaparte.

Elizabeth, or Betsy as she was known, was the exquisite daughter of a wealthy Irish immigrant.  Known for her beauty and risqué fashion sense, Betsy was not one “…intended for obscurity.”  Young Betsy met the dashing Jerome one fall evening at a ball in Baltimore.  Jerome was swept off his feet, and married Betsy a few months later.  Napoleon was not happy and called for his brother to annul the marriage and return to France at once.  Jerome defied him and stayed in the U.S.  

A year later, Betsy and Jerome travelled to France for the coronation of Napoleon, but the emperor denied their entry until the marriage was annulled.  It was while stuck in Amsterdam that Betsy learned she was pregnant, and hoped that this would be the key to ending the family strife.  Unfortunately, it was not to be.  Betsy gave birth to a son, Jerome Napoleon, in July, and shortly after their marriage was over.  Jerome would go on to marry Catharina of Wurttemburg.  Betsy would never remarry and spend the rest of her life fighting for acceptance of her son at European courts.

In the end, Betsy expected her son to marry royalty.  Bo, as he was called, defied his mother, and like his father married American heiress Susan Mary Williams.

image

(Source: scandalouswoman.blogspot.com, via theironduchess)

saggiest:

constantly looking forward to retirement 

(via fuckyeahtxtposts)

theirishaesthete:

A Pale Reflection
120 St Stephen’s Green is one of a pair of houses on the west side of the square designed by Richard Castle to look from the exterior like a single unit.

theirishaesthete:

A Pale Reflection

120 St Stephen’s Green is one of a pair of houses on the west side of the square designed by Richard Castle to look from the exterior like a single unit.

(via thesixthduke)

unflirty:

bondoge:

unflirty:

when i die, cremate me and put my ashes into the pepper shakers at my favorite restaurant

what the fuck

(it’s red lobster)

(via fuckyeahtxtposts)

pre-raphaelisme:


The Black Brunswicker by John Everett Millais
The painting was inspired in part by the exploits of the Black Brunswickers, a volunteer corps of the Napoleonic Wars, during the Waterloo campaign. And in part by the contrasts of black broadcloth and pearl-white satin in a moment of tender conflict. The painting depicts a Brunswicker about to depart for battle. His sweetheart, wearing a ballgown, restrains him, trying to push the door closed, while he pulls it open. This suggests that the scene is inspired by the Duchess of Richmond’s ball on 15 June 1815, from which the officers departed to join troops at the Battle of Quatre Bras. In a letter to Millais’ wife, Effie Gray, Millais described his inspiration for the work, referring to a conversation with William Howard Russell, the war correspondent of The Times:



My subject appears to me, too, most fortunate, and Russell thinks it first-rate. It is connected with the Brunswick Cavalry at Waterloo…They were nearly annihilated but performed prodigies of valour… I have it all in my mind’s eye and feel confident that it will be a prodigious success. The costume and incident are so powerful that I am astonished it has never been touched upon before. Russell was quite struck with it, and he is the best man for knowing the public taste. Nothing could be kinder than his interest, and he is to set about getting all the information that is required.



The same letter states that he intends it to be “a perfect pendant to The Huguenot”, Millais’s first major success, which portrays a similar scene featuring two lovers gazing at each other longingly. Originally Millais intended the two paintings to be even more similar than they are by repeating the motif of the armband used in the earlier painting. He wanted the soldier to be wearing a black crepe mourning armband, with “the sweetheart of the young soldier sewing it around his arm”. The armband idea was quickly dropped as it does not appear in any extant preparatory drawings. Millais reduced the presence of Napoleon to an engraving after Jacques-Louis David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps, which is framed on the damask-hung wall, and which “perplexed the critics with the possible intricacies of cross purposes and rival jealousies” according to the reviewer from Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine. This refers to the fact that some critics took the print to imply that the female character was an admirer of Napoleon, and so she was trying to prevent her lover from joining the army for both personal and political reasons. As the critic of The Times surmised, “her reluctance is due in part to a romantic admiration for this great conquerer.” Other critics suggest the print was intended to allude to both the Waterloo campaign and to more recent events, particularly Napoleon III’s repetition of his predecessor’s crossing of the Alps by his attack on Austrian controlled Italy in 1859. Cr: Wikipedia

pre-raphaelisme:

The Black Brunswicker by John Everett Millais

The painting was inspired in part by the exploits of the Black Brunswickers, a volunteer corps of the Napoleonic Wars, during the Waterloo campaign. And in part by the contrasts of black broadcloth and pearl-white satin in a moment of tender conflict. The painting depicts a Brunswicker about to depart for battle. His sweetheart, wearing a ballgown, restrains him, trying to push the door closed, while he pulls it open. This suggests that the scene is inspired by the Duchess of Richmond’s ball on 15 June 1815, from which the officers departed to join troops at the Battle of Quatre Bras. In a letter to Millais’ wife, Effie Gray, Millais described his inspiration for the work, referring to a conversation with William Howard Russell, the war correspondent of The Times:

My subject appears to me, too, most fortunate, and Russell thinks it first-rate. It is connected with the Brunswick Cavalry at Waterloo…They were nearly annihilated but performed prodigies of valour… I have it all in my mind’s eye and feel confident that it will be a prodigious success. The costume and incident are so powerful that I am astonished it has never been touched upon before. Russell was quite struck with it, and he is the best man for knowing the public taste. Nothing could be kinder than his interest, and he is to set about getting all the information that is required.

The same letter states that he intends it to be “a perfect pendant to The Huguenot”, Millais’s first major success, which portrays a similar scene featuring two lovers gazing at each other longingly. Originally Millais intended the two paintings to be even more similar than they are by repeating the motif of the armband used in the earlier painting. He wanted the soldier to be wearing a black crepe mourning armband, with “the sweetheart of the young soldier sewing it around his arm”. The armband idea was quickly dropped as it does not appear in any extant preparatory drawings. Millais reduced the presence of Napoleon to an engraving after Jacques-Louis David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps, which is framed on the damask-hung wall, and which “perplexed the critics with the possible intricacies of cross purposes and rival jealousies” according to the reviewer from Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine. This refers to the fact that some critics took the print to imply that the female character was an admirer of Napoleon, and so she was trying to prevent her lover from joining the army for both personal and political reasons. As the critic of The Times surmised, “her reluctance is due in part to a romantic admiration for this great conquerer.” Other critics suggest the print was intended to allude to both the Waterloo campaign and to more recent events, particularly Napoleon III’s repetition of his predecessor’s crossing of the Alps by his attack on Austrian controlled Italy in 1859. Cr: Wikipedia

(via duchessofwellington)

enednoviel:

Sharpe’s Enemy - Richard Sharpe and Patrick Harper Moments

(via duchessofwellington)

godmuva:

acidwrapper:

godmuva:

You ever ate something so good that like hours after you finish it you lowkey start to miss it

:/

is that why i miss her so much?

Im talking about a good ass sandwich and yall over here taking about pussy. I’ll see yall in church.

(via fuckyeahtxtposts)

jaded-mandarin:


The Lamb Children, 1783.



by Sir Joshua Reynolds
These are the three sons of the 1st Viscount Melbourne and Elizabeth Milbanke. William in the skeleton suit will later become Prime Minister. 

jaded-mandarin:

The Lamb Children, 1783.

by Sir Joshua Reynolds

These are the three sons of the 1st Viscount Melbourne and Elizabeth Milbanke. William in the skeleton suit will later become Prime Minister. 

(via sea-deviltry)

boatporn:


My parents didn’t believe me when I said that a Barkentine was a kind of ship.

boatporn:

My parents didn’t believe me when I said that a Barkentine was a kind of ship.

(Source: peynirkizartmasi, via rolypolydandy)

stability:

So many songs to download so little motivation

(via fuckyeahtxtposts)

aseaofquotes:

Lord Byron, “She Walks in Beauty”
Submitted by veilles.

aseaofquotes:

Lord Byron, “She Walks in Beauty”

Submitted by veilles.

(via cakesandfail)

joachimmurat:

taocder:

Scenes of Everyday Life and People in 1790 (Source) by Thomas Rowlandson. 
Details: 1. A soldier assessing new recruits for the army. 2. A woman driving a phaeton. 3. Couple walking. 4. A solder escorting two women. 5. A tea party. 6. An equestrian about to go on a ride. 7. An industrious woman sewing.  8. A well-dressed man peers at a woman through his eye-glass. 9. A musical interlude with two ladies. 10. An outing in the country.  12. Bird watching or gazing at ships along the seashore? 13. Arrival at an inn, or examining his accounts? 14. Street vendors.

Rowlandson’s little drawings are so…spot on, arent they. Not even the ones that are meant to be caricatures, just these things. They really capture the late Georgian spirit.

joachimmurat:

taocder:

Scenes of Everyday Life and People in 1790 (Source) by Thomas Rowlandson.

Details:
1. A soldier assessing new recruits for the army.
image
2. A woman driving a phaeton.
image
3. Couple walking.
image
4. A solder escorting two women.
image
5. A tea party.
image
6. An equestrian about to go on a ride.
image
7. An industrious woman sewing.
image
8. A well-dressed man peers at a woman through his eye-glass.
image
9. A musical interlude with two ladies.
image
10. An outing in the country.
image
12. Bird watching or gazing at ships along the seashore?
image
13. Arrival at an inn, or examining his accounts?
image
14. Street vendors.
image

Rowlandson’s little drawings are so…spot on, arent they. Not even the ones that are meant to be caricatures, just these things. They really capture the late Georgian spirit.

gaydream-believer:

if you wanna understand how Europe works remember that for ages syphilis was known as ‘the French disease’ in Italy, Poland and Germany, ‘the Italian disease’ in France, ‘the Spanish disease’ in Poland, ‘the Polish disease’ in Russia, ‘the Christian disease’ or ‘the Western European disease’ in Turkey, and ‘the British disease’ in Tahiti

(via cakesandfail)