Lady Cas has a Tiger

"The ladies & dandies have taken to ride in the Mall in St James’s Park in such numbers as to be quite a nuisance."

labellefilleart:

 Portrait of Two Women, Said to Be the Baroness Pichon and Mme de Fourcroy, Henri-François Riesener 

labellefilleart:

 Portrait of Two Women, Said to Be the Baroness Pichon and Mme de Fourcroy, Henri-François Riesener 

(via joachimmurat)

“Principles are like prayers. Noble, of course, but awkward at a party.”

—   Harsh truths from Violet Crawley (via sara-wrote-this)

(via lediableaquatre)

teadrunktailor:

scjacka:

Speaking of amazing fictional ladies

True Story: I want to be Captain Amelia when I grow up.

(Source: apricotedits, via vfreie)

Stephen’s voice floated down from the upper regions to say that if Captain Aubrey chose to come up he would see the most remarkable sight; he might make the ascent quite easily and safely by the ropes on the left, on the larboard side looking forward.

"What the devil did you let him get up there for?" said Jack, frowning upon Mr. Fenton. "He must be at the crosstrees." And pitching his voice aloft, "Hold fast. Do not move. I am with you this minute."

—   Patrick O’Brian, The Surgeon’s Mate, Ch. 9
In which Stephen Maturin is a troll and shows off to Jagiello (via morethanpx)

(via maturins)

n-nevskaya-n:

Romola Garai and Ioan Gruffudd in Amazing Grace.

n-nevskaya-n:

Romola Garai and Ioan Gruffudd in Amazing Grace.

(via auntiehornblower)

“The best portion of your life will be the small, nameless moments you spend smiling with someone who matters to you.”

—   Unknown (via endangerment)

(Source: psych-facts, via fuckyeahtxtposts)

gentlemaninkhaki:

The Soldier’s Departure by George Morland, 1791.

gentlemaninkhaki:

The Soldier’s Departure by George Morland, 1791.

(via joachimmurat)

juliet:

what's in a name? that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet; so romeo would, were he not romeo call'd, retain that dear perfection which he owes without a--

romeo:

nice nice, so art thou a virgin?

austenprovisions:

"Mr. Elton was still talking, still engaged in some interesting detail; and Emma experienced some disappointment when she found that he was only giving his fair companion an account of the yesterday’s party at his friend Cole’s, and that she was come in herself for the Stilton cheese, the north Wiltshire, the butter, the cellery, the beet-root and all of the dessert.”
- Emma, Jane Austen

austenprovisions:

"Mr. Elton was still talking, still engaged in some interesting detail; and Emma experienced some disappointment when she found that he was only giving his fair companion an account of the yesterday’s party at his friend Cole’s, and that she was come in herself for the Stilton cheese, the north Wiltshire, the butter, the cellery, the beet-root and all of the dessert.”

Emma, Jane Austen

valeriuvaleriu:

Ridicule / Patrice Leconte / 1996

(via eighteenthcenturyfiction)

“When you’re learning about something and dissecting it, I don’t think you’re really through until you don’t understand anything about it. If you study something and you find all this stuff about it, you just went skin deep, so if you keep going and going, you should be left with a fucking mess of unanswered questions. If you take any subject and keep asking, “Why,” without stopping, you’ll get to a point where there really [aren’t] any clear answers.”

—   Louis C.K. (via austinkleon)

(via cadenceofpoesy)

finethankyouandyou:

Natasha Rostova’s first ball… dancing with Prince Andrei Bolkonsky.
Vyacheslav Tikhonov and Lyudmila Savelyeva in a scene from Sergei Bondarchuk’s glorious film War and Peace (1967)

finethankyouandyou:

Natasha Rostova’s first ball… dancing with Prince Andrei Bolkonsky.

Vyacheslav Tikhonov and Lyudmila Savelyeva in a scene from Sergei Bondarchuk’s glorious film War and Peace (1967)

(via joachimmurat)

carnivour:

may the wings of your eyeliner always be even.

(Source: carnivour, via fuckyeahtxtposts)

teambingley:

 “dandy chargers” (early nineteenth-century proto-bicycles propelled forward with the feet). Most of these caricatures seem to associate reckless biking with spoiled, foppish young men — interesting, then, that the last one shows an effeminate dandy getting smoked by what appears to be a naval officer:

"The Dandy Charger’s all the go,
Ten Knots an hour, Yeo, heave, ho
I scud along on this Machine,
While gaping crowds are laughing seen,
And every Dandy that I pass
I’ll leave sprawling on his A—!”

The first three caricatures are William Heath’s doing; not sure about the last one. Images courtesy of the British Museum’s online archive.

(via joachimmurat)